The Blue Mountain Field Science is a week-long course for 26 high school students interested in the natural sciences. Students will learn about the geological and biological processes that have shaped the unique landscape of Walla Walla County through daily outdoor field study. Each day, students will visit locations around the region that will involve experiential, hands-on learning. Course instruction is provided by Whitman College faculty Tim Parker (Biology & Environmental Studies) and Nick Bader (Geology).

Students who participate in Blue Mountain Field Science will be steeped in exploration of the natural environment, giving real-life meaning to academic learning while deepening their understanding of the natural world.

Blue Mountain Field Science is for students looking to explore environmental systems while honing their field research skills, all in the beauty of the Columbia River to the Blue Mountains.

For more information or questions about the program, please contact Lauren Platman at lauren@bmlt.org or 509-525-3136.

Blue Mountain Field Science Syllabus


Dates: June 17 - June 21, 2019

Open to incoming 9 - 12 graders.  

Cost: $250 per student. Please contact lauren@bmlt.org or 509-525-3136 if in need of financial assistance.

 

Instructors

Nick Bader, Associate Professor of Environmental Geology   Nick's interest in geology was sparked as a child after seeing the remains of prehistoric creatures at the Museum of Natural History in New York. After high school, he studied geology at Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana and earned Master's at the University of Arizona at Tucson. At the University of California at Santa Cruz, he earned my doctorate for his work on the influence of plants and soil microbes on the global carbon cycle, and on global climate. Nick's current research interest is paleosols (ancient buried soil horizons) and what they can tell us about past climate.

Nick Bader, Associate Professor of Environmental Geology

Nick's interest in geology was sparked as a child after seeing the remains of prehistoric creatures at the Museum of Natural History in New York. After high school, he studied geology at Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana and earned Master's at the University of Arizona at Tucson. At the University of California at Santa Cruz, he earned my doctorate for his work on the influence of plants and soil microbes on the global carbon cycle, and on global climate. Nick's current research interest is paleosols (ancient buried soil horizons) and what they can tell us about past climate.

Tim Parker, Chair, Department of Biology & Interdisciplinary Program in Environmental Studies   Growing up, Tim Parker spent as much time as possible in the woodlands, swamps, and marshes of Massachusetts and Georgia. In college he developed an interest in birds, and this led to a stint as a biological technician at Olympic National Park followed by graduate degrees at Kansas State University and the University of New Mexico. After graduate school, he conducted post-doctoral research back in Kansas and at Oxford University in the UK. He is now Associate Professor and Chair of the Biology Department at Whitman College. His research interests are broad; much of his work has involved birds but he is fascinated by plant ecology and has a long running study of a Columbia Basin grassland at the Wallula Gap Biological Station.

Tim Parker, Chair, Department of Biology & Interdisciplinary Program in Environmental Studies

Growing up, Tim Parker spent as much time as possible in the woodlands, swamps, and marshes of Massachusetts and Georgia. In college he developed an interest in birds, and this led to a stint as a biological technician at Olympic National Park followed by graduate degrees at Kansas State University and the University of New Mexico. After graduate school, he conducted post-doctoral research back in Kansas and at Oxford University in the UK. He is now Associate Professor and Chair of the Biology Department at Whitman College. His research interests are broad; much of his work has involved birds but he is fascinated by plant ecology and has a long running study of a Columbia Basin grassland at the Wallula Gap Biological Station.